Human resources

7 QUESTIONS TO ASK AT THE INTERVIEW

1. What does success look like for me after the first 90 days if I am hired for this position?
2. Do you measure performance by numbers or by feelings?
3. How do you see my personality and skills fitting in to your mission?
4. What is the one area about my skills where you need more information
5. Is this a committee hiring decision or a single person?
6. What is the percentage of teamwork versus the work I’ll do alone?
7. What is the one change your company is going through that you are most concerned about?

Hire for attitude and train for the skills:

Curiosity

Creativity

Empathy

Kindness

Optimism

Teamwork

Hunt for these skills:

Customer Service Skills

Bilingual ability

Multi-tasking skills

Persuasion

Negotiation

Communication

 

When Prospect Skills Don’t Match the Job

You found the personality and the attitude, but the skills are lacking. You might have been talking with him/her for the past twenty minutes and really like what you see and hear. But you are skittish because there is a serious lack of skills.

Here is what you do:

  • Set up a ninety-day training with two managers as instructors for the skills. This is unpaid training unless you have fifteen hundred dollars to burn through.
  • Tie a performance review directly back to training and accomplishments. You have to gauge how easily this person can pick up skills. Make sure the candidate understands this.
  • No go? Encourage the new hire to find those skills independently. Assure them that you want to talk with them after six months to see if knowledge has developed.

The Bad Hire

You should evaluate all your new hires at the end of 90 days. The common problems of a bad hire are:

New hire failure to meet deadlines

New employee caused customer complaints

New hire failure to work productively in team environment

New hire had Infectious negative attitude

New hire failure to produce quality work

New hire unreliability and poor attendance

Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch third-party recruiters, recruitment agencies or staffing agencies notification

Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch Weltsch will not pay any fees to a third-party recruiter, agency or other staffing vendor that has not first coordinated their recruiting activity with the appropriate member of the Talent Acquisition Department (TAD) and obtained a signed agreement with Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch Weltsch.

The agreement must be signed by Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch to receive any payment for a candidate placement or introduction. No employee or representative of Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch has authority to sign such agreements. Verbal commitments from any Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch staff member, and written commitments from any staff members will not be binding upon Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch. The agreement must also be dated prior to the date of resume or CV submission for Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch to pay any fees.

Any resume or CV submitted, solicited or unsolicited, to any employee of Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch without having a current, Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch vendor agreement in place, will be considered the sole property of Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch. Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch will not be held liable to pay a placement or other fee in connection with such a submission.

Candidate introductions, resumes or CVs must only be submitted via the TAD and only if: a) a vendor agreement is already in place, signed by the Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch; and b) the agency has received a formal instruction from a member of the TAD to submit candidates for a vacancy.

It is the responsibility of all third-party recruiting/staffing agencies/vendors to know and follow this policy.

Lee Anne Wonnacott Weltsch, an entrepreneur never takes an opportunity for granted. Tactics, strategies, and smarts kick in and go to work. She has been trekking along the path to success since an early age. Lee Anne has established himself as a selective recruiter in the small business environment.

https://www.leeanneWonnacott.com/contact-us/